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GEA Westfalia Separator Group
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Pea Starch and Pea Protein

Whilst other legumes like soy or lupines are key for obtaining proteins, the pea is also an important source of starch. GEA Westfalia Separator Group supports the wet process used to obtain both valuable substances, starch and protein, in a single process.

Process line at a glance

In addition to decanters for extraction and dewatering, 3-phase nozzle separators and clarifiers are used, so this process reflects the company‘s full range of products.

Integrated process line from GEA Westfalia Separator Group for obtaining pea starch and pea protein

Integrated process line from GEA Westfalia Separator Group for obtaining pea starch and pea protein

First extraction stage: Obtaining proteins

The cleaned peas are steeped in caustic soda, split open and then fed into a double extraction stage. As early as the first extraction stage, the decanter separates a pure protein liquid from which the proteins are precipitated in bypass with the aid of acid and heat. In order to achieve as high as possible a yield of pea protein, the precipitated proteins first pass through a decanter for dewatering and then through a clarifier. The dewatered protein goes straight to drying.

Second extraction stage: Obtaining starch

Before the pea starch can be washed in the main stream, the coarser plant fibers still need to be extracted. Nothing is wasted here either – the coarser fibers from extraction are dewatered and dried by a decanter so that they can be traded as a by-product, just like the fine fibers separated out of the first washing stage. The latest-generation 3-phase nozzle separators are used for the 3-stage washing process. The raw starch milk is finally dewatered and dried by a decanter.

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